Classified Realty Group



Posted by Classified Realty Group on 1/29/2019

Many homeowners are unaware that the most common causes of house fires are cooking related. According to data from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), cooking fires cause 46% of house fires and 44% of household injuries.

You arenít alone if you think those numbers are shockingly high. However, most of us are never taught cooking safety techniques. In this article, weíre going to give you some tips to protect you and your family from the most common and some lesser known causes of kitchen fires. 

Cooking fire statistics 

Knowing the most common causes of cooking fires is a great way to understand just how dangerous certain types of cooking really are. The NFPA reports that frying is the most dangerous type of cooking. Two-thirds of cooking fires were the result of the ignition of food and cooking materials.

In terms of equipment, the range or cooktop is the most dangerous part of the kitchen, causing over 60% of fires. However, much of the time the cause comes down to leaving your equipment unattended.

Cooking safely

One of the most important things you can do to reduce the risk of house fires is to stay in the kitchen while youíre cooking. Unattended ranges, stovetops, and ovens can be particularly deadly since they can happen as a result of someone dozing off while watching television, or someone forgetting they left a burner on after they go to sleep.

A good way to monitor your cooking is to always use a timer, even if you donít necessarily need one for the cooking that youíre doing. Also, be sure that your smoke detectors are working and that you have a functional fire extinguisher in your home. Make sure your family knows what to do if they encounter a fire.

Before you turn on your burners before frying, make sure there is nothing around your oven that can catch fire. A food container, oven mitts, wooden utensils, paper towels, or curtains could all potentially catch fire if they come in close contact with a burner.

Clothing is also a leading cause of kitchen fires that turn fatal. Make sure sleeves and other pieces of clothing arenít near any burners or open flames.

In case of fire

If you encounter a large cooking fire that is spreading throughout, the best thing to do is to immediately gather your family and get out of the house, avoiding the kitchen entirely. Call 9-1-1 as soon as you are safely outside and donít re-enter the house under any circumstances.

For small grease fires, smother the fire with a lid and turn off the burner immediately.

Understanding cooking fires

Most fire requires oxygen to burn and spread. If there is a small fire in your kitchen, using a soaked towel or a pan lid to smother it will suffice.

However, grease fires work differently. Never put water on a grease fire, this can cause the fire to spread very quickly. Rather, use a lid to put out the fire if it is small enough to get near. You can also throw baking soda, or use a fire extinguisher on a small grease fire.




Tags: home safety   kitchen   Cooking  
Categories: Home Safety   kitchen   cooking  


Posted by Classified Realty Group on 11/18/2014

If you are moving into a new home with young children, it is very important to have a safety strategy in place. Moving into a larger house with a young family can always be a real challenge. When taking the needed precautions early on, you can be assured your children will be safe. This is especially true when you're moving into a brand-new home from an apartment. 1. Establish a secure cabinet for cleaning supplies: When determining the storage area for your cleaning supplies, be certain to choose a location that cannot be accessed by a child. Keeping all of your detergent and household chemicals in one area that is difficult to reach, and protected with a child safety lock, will keep your children away from these harmful materials. Establishing this designated area early on will allow you to isolate harmful chemicals that are brought into your home immediately. 2. Cover your electrical outlets: Placing plastic socket covers in each of your unused electrical outlets is the best way to protect your child. If you have kids that are just starting to crawl and explore, there is a good chance they will try to put their fingers into an unprotected electrical socket. Socket covers are a simple precaution to take to help protect your child against injuries caused by electrical shock. 3. Check your smoke alarms often and install a carbon monoxide detector: When you are moving into a new home, it's always best to inspect or replace the smoke alarms and install a carbon monoxide detector right away. Installing these devices will not only benefit your children, but will benefit your family as a whole. Be certain that your early warning devices are well maintained and in good working order at all times. Early detection of carbon monoxide build up, or fire is the best way to prevent injury to your family members in this type of emergency situation. 4. Set up barriers: Make sure that you are always locking your doors, blocking off stairways and securing windows. This can prevent falls by children who are curiously exploring their new environment. Installing baby gates will prevent your child from accessing areas that could be potentially dangerous, or leaving an area that is child safe. Placing child safety locks on windows and your doors will †help to prevent accidents while making your home more secure at the same time.